Iconic Store Designs

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pseudo3d
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Joined: 24 Sep 2012 00:04

Re: Iconic Store Designs

Post by pseudo3d » 01 Feb 2017 18:38

Ephrata1966 wrote: For anyone interested in Grand Union history, there's a Fiesta supermarket in southwestern Houston that first was a Weingarten's, then Grand Union, then Safeway, then AppleTree, then Kroger, and finally Fiesta.
It was never a Grand Union. GU bought the Weingarten stores in 1980 (Weingarten itself still operates today as a real estate company) and converted them to GU stores in all but name, including a variation on the "red dot" logo. In 1984, however, they sold off all of the stores. Most of them were sold to Safeway, which, if I understand correctly, continued to operate them as Weingarten for a few months (though one Weingarten did remain independent and open until 1986, when it was sold to Rice Food Markets).

Likewise when the Houston division was spun off, it briefly operated as Safeway (seeing as Safeway was still doing a lot of back-end work, including their items) before renaming as AppleTree. So the supermarket you're referring to operated under 5 names, not six.

rvwalton
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Re: Iconic Store Designs

Post by rvwalton » 02 Feb 2017 23:17

wnetmacman wrote:We all know that several of the larger, more national chains had some very popular, iconic store designs. By iconic, I mean it was always immediately recognized as having been built by that chain. ...But what about other chains? From a regional standpoint is best, because I don't believe we have had too many more truly national retailers. If you have pictures, include them.

And because I know our humble host would prefer this, let's try to keep the discussion *pre-1980*. Thanks.
Thanks to Pleasant Family Shopping, here is a picture of a vintage 1950's Jewel white tile front supermarket. The top of the facade was trimmed in orange tile. Image

They used this type of facade since the 1930's when they acquired Loblaw's Chicago business and proceeded to expand like mushrooms after a rainstorm. While there might be others, the Jewel-Osco on Chicago Avenue in Evanston still operates in the original white front building, albeit expanded several times.

In the 1960's they shifted to a design that resembled a ranch home. Actually, they had a couple of designs. Some were white brick and some were brown. Thanks again to Pleasant Family Shopping for this picture:

Image

pseudo3d
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Re: Iconic Store Designs

Post by pseudo3d » 03 Feb 2017 18:43

rvwalton wrote:
wnetmacman wrote:We all know that several of the larger, more national chains had some very popular, iconic store designs. By iconic, I mean it was always immediately recognized as having been built by that chain. ...But what about other chains? From a regional standpoint is best, because I don't believe we have had too many more truly national retailers. If you have pictures, include them.

And because I know our humble host would prefer this, let's try to keep the discussion *pre-1980*. Thanks.
Thanks to Pleasant Family Shopping, here is a picture of a vintage 1950's Jewel white tile front supermarket. The top of the facade was trimmed in orange tile. Image

They used this type of facade since the 1930's when they acquired Loblaw's Chicago business and proceeded to expand like mushrooms after a rainstorm. While there might be others, the Jewel-Osco on Chicago Avenue in Evanston still operates in the original white front building, albeit expanded several times.
Unfortunately, it looks like while it's on the same site, it's not the same building. The Cook County Commissioner's office shows the building as being less than 40 years old, and indeed, looking at the site, it looks like the original white building was torn down for the narrow current store sometime in the 1980s.

wnetmacman
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Re: Iconic Store Designs

Post by wnetmacman » 03 Feb 2017 20:18

pseudo3d wrote:Unfortunately, it looks like while it's on the same site, it's not the same building. The Cook County Commissioner's office shows the building as being less than 40 years old, and indeed, looking at the site, it looks like the original white building was torn down for the narrow current store sometime in the 1980s.
And looking at Historic Aerials, I would agree with this. The old store was at the extreme northern part of the current store, but with a decidedly different footprint.
Scott Greer

rich
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Location: Washington, DC

Re: Iconic Store Designs

Post by rich » 04 Feb 2017 21:25

Grand Union was not the only chain to use a shingled roof. Fazio's in the Cleveland area used this as their prototype from the mid-60s into the 1980s: http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_Ei2Ik5quiI0/R ... s+1971.jpg Fazio also used the theme inside their stores.

Many chains used mansard roofs, shingled and otherwise, during that period, including Acme (post A-frame and also on remodels of 50s era stores), National Tea, and even A&P (post-Centennial).

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