Extinct Supermarket Merchandise

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jamcool
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Post by jamcool » 31 Dec 2006 00:50

I also remember Pillsbury's "Space Food Sticks". Supposedly NASA astronauts ate this on space missions.

I remember those, they had the taste of a Tootsie Roll, only softer (and "vitamin fortified")

Don't forget those other "fine" products from the Doughboy, Sweet-10 liquid sugar substitute and Funny Face drink mix, originally made with cyclamates!

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Dave
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Post by Dave » 31 Dec 2006 08:23

Cyclamates were great. No calories, no aftertaste, and killed mice with cancer. I remember the brief shining moment when Funny Face, Tab, Diet Pepsi, Diet-Rite Cola, and others all had cyclamates. I don't think any artifical sweetener has ever beat cyclamates.

There's a company in Virginia Beach that specializes in mail orders of groceries and candy that is hard to find. They have a list of things that aren't made any more that's interesting. It's also interesting to see what they sell from the standpoint that some things taken for granted as being available in some parts of the country aren't available in other parts of the country. Here's their website:

http://www.hometownfavorites.com/index_dyn.asp[/url]

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TheStranger
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Post by TheStranger » 31 Dec 2006 16:44

Dave wrote:Cyclamates were great. No calories, no aftertaste, and killed mice with cancer. I remember the brief shining moment when Funny Face, Tab, Diet Pepsi, Diet-Rite Cola, and others all had cyclamates. I don't think any artifical sweetener has ever beat cyclamates.
I keep thinking that cyclamates were recently reapproved for human consumption or something like that...although Splenda seems to be the new alternative to saccharin/aspartame.
Chris Sampang

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J-Mac
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Post by J-Mac » 10 Jan 2007 01:56

How about Sunshine Bakeries products? I have a friend that is upset that Hydrox Cookies are no longer avaliable.

Ah well.

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Dave
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Post by Dave » 10 Jan 2007 09:18

J-Mac wrote:How about Sunshine Bakeries products? I have a friend that is upset that Hydrox Cookies are no longer avaliable.

Ah well.
Some of the Sunshine products are still around, but not Hydrox. Sunshine Bakeries used to be part of American Brands with American Tobacco, Jim Beam, etc. An old family friend was the chief engineer for them and was very loyal to the company - he always had Hydrox, never Oreo.

The cookies used in Hydrox were sweeter than those in an Oreo. Hydrox was also the first "creme-filled chocolate sandwich cookie" - Oreo began as a knockoff of Hydrox.

jamcool
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Post by jamcool » 10 Jan 2007 13:17

Sunshine was bought out by Keebler, most of the Sunshine products were put under the Keebler brand-except for CheezIt and Krispy crackers. And Hydrox are now called "Droxies"

MrsWrightsLovechild
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Post by MrsWrightsLovechild » 10 Jan 2007 21:00

Some of the AWG stores here in OKC carry Shasta. Don't know if Shasta has streamlined their line of flavors, but I don't think the stores here carry the full line. I remember there being many more flavors as a kid wondering the aisles of Boogaarts (a regional grocer in KS).

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Post by MBZ321 » 11 Jan 2007 22:40

jamcool wrote:Sunshine was bought out by Keebler, most of the Sunshine products were put under the Keebler brand-except for CheezIt and Krispy crackers. And Hydrox are now called "Droxies"
They may be called Droxies now, but i've seen them, and not many others have either judging by a google search for "droxies"

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Post by krogerclerk » 12 Jan 2007 01:50

Droxies appeared briefly around 1998-99 after Keebler took over Sunshine. They dissapeared from grocery shelves after less than a year around here. Sunshine seems to be reserved for Cheez-it and the saltines in this area at least.

Faygo is easier found now than Shasta, primarily at Fred's dollar stores.
I went in Walgreens and saw Royal gelatins and puddings, not used to gelatin and pudding mixes in a drug store and probably would have never looked if they weren't mentioned in this thread.

Jason B.
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Reese's Pieces, Sunshine Products, Stove Top Popcorn, Flour

Post by Jason B. » 12 Jan 2007 05:45

In 1982, "Reese's Pieces" became a popular candy, largely because of their placement in the movie "E.T."

In the early '80s, a cracker was sold called "Nachos." This product was heavily promoted in T.V. advertising wherein supermarket patrons sang a corny jingle, "There's a new nacho cracker! A new nacho cracker!" As I recall, they tasted like heavily-spiced Ritz crackers.

The Sunshine baked products line ran T.V. ads in the late '80s with the song "Have a little sunshine" as people were depicted consuming various Sunshine products. A Sunshine bakery was located in Oakland, California near the Oakland Coliseum, but I don't know if it's still open.

Regarding popcorn, in the pre-microwave oven era, it used to be sold in stove top packets. As I recall, one placed the aluminum container into a frying pan and popped the corn via stove top conduction. I don't think popcorn is sold this way anymore.

It would be interesting to see how retail flour sales have changed over the years. At the beginning of the 20th century, I believe that flour accounted for a significant share of grocery store sales because most families baked their own bread. When grocery stores held grand opening events in the 1920s and '30s, flour companies often sponsored tables or flour was sold at a special price to draw patrons. At the beginning of the 21st century, some families don't even consume bread at home, let alone purchase it.

jamcool
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Post by jamcool » 13 Jan 2007 23:22

Add another disappearing brand - Dolly Madison Baked Goods. Items like Zingers are now branded Hostess (Hostess and Dolly Madison are made by the same company)

Super S
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Post by Super S » 17 Jan 2007 01:40

Dolly Madison. I forgot about them until now, and seem to remember for a while they used Peanuts charachters in some of their advertising.

rich
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Post by rich » 17 Jan 2007 12:01

Dolly is still around on things like cinnamon cakes. i just saw them in the little conevinece store in my office building.

klkla
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Post by klkla » 17 Jan 2007 17:19

One 'extinct' supermarket item I rewmember form when I worked at Mayfair Markets in the early 80's was the 'house dress' (also known as a mumu). Most supermarkets had a small section selling house dresses and cheap shoes. The dresses were brightly colored/patterned and usually worn by full figured women. The Mrs. Roper character on Three's Company usually wore a mumu. Thank god this product has become extinct!

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Post by Dean » 19 Jan 2007 23:33

Dave wrote:There's a company in Virginia Beach that specializes in mail orders of groceries and candy that is hard to find. They have a list of things that aren't made any more that's interesting. It's also interesting to see what they sell from the standpoint that some things taken for granted as being available in some parts of the country aren't available in other parts of the country.
There is a store in Los Angeles that specializes in soft drinks that are not generally sold in most stores. Older products and such. LA TIMES had an article about the store a time back. I'd have to research to find the name/website. Unless someone in Southern California can think of the name! thanks!

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